Moving Out and Moving On

We stood there awkwardly while a little boy danced around in the doorway, waiting for his parents to come solve the mystery of who these strangers were, standing on his new front porch.

My daughter and I looked at each other sheepishly as we heard faint commotion coming from inside the house and footsteps finally approaching.

“Hi!” I said as brightly as possible, with a jug of cider and box of donuts extended outward. “We’re your new neighbors from right next door!”

My higher-than-normal pitched voice and shiny demeanor were completely betraying my real feelings in this moment, but it wouldn’t be the first time, right? Here I was, trying to do the right thing.

You see, one of my dearest and best friends used to live in that house. She moved out a few months earlier, taking the next step in her life to join lives and households with her longtime boyfriend. And while I can only be happy for her and want every last single good thing for her in this world, let me be clear: I did not want her to move.

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As weird fate would have it, she moved in 7 years ago on the exact day my ex-husband was moving out. And as the world inside my beloved home was crashing and burning down around me, I could not have known a whole new world was about to open up right next door to me.

She too, was a divorced single mom. She was strong and hilarious. Irreverent. Brave. Smart and spicy in all the best ways. Lots of PG-13 lingo and zero fucks to give. We loved her outrageously and she loved us back the exact same way. We became fast friends, and there was soon a well-worn path between our two homes. We laughed like crazy with our single-girl shenanigans. And we cried a lot, too. Broken marriages. Broken homes. Broken dreams. Some broken kids along the way. We battled mice and snakes and birds and flooded basements. And new boyfriends. Together. We would mow our lawns and have a beer after, with a continuous flow of never-ending girl chat.  You don’t make a lot of new “best” friends in your forties, and I had struck gold. I was living the grown up version of “when we get older we’ll live next door to each other…”

So the day she tenderly broke the news that she and her love were looking at houses, I fell apart. As time passed and they eventually found their new home, I struggled desperately to be happy for her, but one night, at the end of a very emotionally charged conversation, I finally blurted out through sobs, “I’m mad at you for leaving me.” (Cue abandonment issues!) And that was the truth. I was mad. I was sad. And I was grieving what would be the end of two soul friends living next door to each other. Her life was moving on in a way that mine was not. And I didn’t want it to be true.

Several weeks passed in a sad silence until one night, neither of us could take it anymore. We talked. We cried. We wept. For what we had. For what we would lose. And then we made plans for how we would adjust. And we have.

For a few months, her house sat empty, which was fine by me. If it was empty, I could almost pretend nothing had changed. I was dreading the day I would see unfamiliar new cars in the driveway and hear strange new voices echoing in the back yard. But now the day was here, which is how I ended up standing bravely on her old front porch with cider and donuts. I had cried in my car on the way home from work that day. I didn’t want new neighbors. I wanted her. And so going over there wasn’t even about them. It was about closure for me. Turning the page. Starting a new chapter.

It honestly wasn’t a great introduction. The husband was overly friendly and the wife, not so much. I texted my friend that night to let her know that my new neighbors were not going to be my new best friends. That much was clear.

But as I walked back across the lawn between our two houses, toward the home I love so much, I couldn’t help but exhale and smile to myself. I hadn’t really fixed anything and there was nothing I could change, but I figure you can stay sad and stuck or you can decide to show up with cider and donuts and move on.

5 thoughts on “Moving Out and Moving On

  1. Kellie says:

    You are my loveliest person ever. Our time next door to one another was a literal dream come true. Not many people are fortunate enough to have what we had. Truly. It was a miracle. I found my other bookend when I found you. There are so many memories I have if those years. That home was one of my lifetime’s truest loves and it always will be for many many reasons; one of them being you and your precious ones.
    I will end what has now become a bit of a blog with a few phrases that I hope you will never forget: the peach evening gown on day 1, “I didn’t know you were pretty!”, foil shields, you denying me our baby and then came Amelia💕, running home one night, drunken parking lot conversations, “i’m in your driveway”, head injury man, the jeep/sweater incident, MESSY CLOSETS -God love them, son of a bitch, “a few minutes to chat”, PG 13 please!, the pot chronicles 🙄🙄🙄, buried in 7 feet of snow and oh, pudding shots😌😌😌. I could go in and on. And I will. Because I know you. Because I love you. Because you are and will always be, my best stuff. Thank you for loving me. Also this….CHER!!! All my love……🥰

    Like

  2. Alonzo Spellcatcher says:

    We love our dear ones deeply and miss them when they leave us. But we know that the bond of love is greater than anything. This bond you two share is undeniable. It will be different, but not broken.
    I wish you simplicity of heart, serenity of mind & the tranquility of soul sweet Julie. You will never be alone

    Like

  3. Michael D Dombrowski says:

    Julie, In one way, I’m sorry for your loss and in another way, I’m jealous that you have what few people have.

    Your friend,

    Like

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